Aline Fuke Fachinetti
  • Yamaha Group
Brazil
Aline Fuke Fachinetti

Aline Fuke Fachinetti

  • Yamaha Group
Brazil

What do you do?

I uncomplicate privacy and data protection challenges we face in our business and promote the ethical use of data by engaging people – and through them, transforming processes and technology. Outside of the corporate world, I help translate privacy and digital citizenship to everyday people.

Why data?

I always liked the intersection between law, technology, and ethics, but becoming a data protection lawyer was not something I consciously planned, it happened over time. I became passionate about the societal implications, regulatory challenges, and corporate governance aspects of data law. One thing that fascinates me is how the rapid technology change has created uncharted territory for professionals to discuss, research, and (try to) collaboratively solve issues across the globe.

What’s keeping you busy?

The Brazilian General Data Protection Law (LGPD) entered into force in September 2020, so Brazilian data practitioners have been remarkably busy for the past two years or so, implementing privacy governance programmes and promoting awareness about the law in Brazil. We are also interested in participating in discussions, contributing to public consultations, and seeing how the newly established ANPD – Brazil’s Data Protection Authority – implements its regulatory and enforcement powers.

What mentors or other influential figures have helped you get where you are today?

I am lucky to say that I have had several amazing mentors throughout my career who have helped me on my path, such as Gustavo Poggio and Daniela Afonso; and – of course – my father, who is also a lawyer and always shows me the importance of transparency, integrity, and hard work. At last, Ayrton Senna, Brazilian Formula One World Champion, who before his untimely passing said a quote that became one of my life mottos: “There is a great desire in me to always improve. That is what makes me happy. And whenever I feel that I am learning less or that my learning curve is levelling, then I am not happy. And that applies not only professionally, but as a person”.

If you could change one data-related law, how and why would you change it?

The LGPD was an incredible advancement for the Brazilian ecosystem, creating a very needed general legislation applicable to all sectors, strengthening data protection, and harmonising the interpretation of data protection principles in the country. One aspect that I think should have been addressed more properly is the processing of children’s data, especially regarding the lawful basis available for processing. The deadlines to answer subject access requests could also have been more realistic (the current period to respond is “immediately” or within up to 15 days of the request, if the data requested is more than a simplified response).

How has covid-19 affected what you do?

Despite the challenging time as a society, there have been some positives. Working from home was a significant improvement to my productivity and it was a year filled with accomplishments career-wise. In terms of privacy-related work and study, I can definitely say my workload has gone up.

What’s the next big thing – what data opportunities are companies now looking at?

The rise of 5G, IOT, and the Internet of Bodies are big opportunity companies are looking at that bring entirely disruptive ways to use data; this will definitively also create increasingly societal and regulatory challenges for companies, individuals, regulators, and – of course – data practitioners.

What’s keeping companies worried at the moment – what are some key data risks?

Cybersecurity threats in general. Emerging data protection laws and multiple regulatory frameworks around the globe that lack consistency, leading to uncertainty over international data transfers and affecting international trade are also a concern. Another aspect that should be considered as a key aspect for organisations is data ethics as a driver for corporate decision-making. In Brazil specifically, I’d say all things LGPD-related, including third-party risk management.

What do you do to relax?

After working in front of a screen for many hours, I enjoy taking my dogs for nice long walks. I also like writing, reading, and spending time with family. When circumstances allow, I am looking forward to being able to travel and scuba dive on weekends and vacation days again.

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